mingw-w64

GCC for Windows 64 & 32 bits

Mingw-w64

Mingw-w64 is an advancement of the original mingw.org project, created to support the GCC compiler on Windows systems. It has forked it in 2007 in order to provide support for 64 bits and new APIs. It has since then gained widespread use and distribution.

The development and community are very active and welcoming with new contributors every month and simple installers.

Version 5 has been released

v5.0.2: 2017-03-28

initial Release: 2016-10-19

  • Fixes to the __mingw_printf family of functions.
  • DirectX updates from Wine.
  • Various updates to support Windows 7 and 10.
  • Various header typo fixes.

You can also look at the full list of versions.

Headers, Libraries and Runtime

  • More than a million lines of headers are provided, not counting generated ones, and regularly expanded to track new Windows APIs.
  • Everything needed for linking and running your code on Windows.
  • Winpthreads, a pthreads library for C++11 threading support and simple integration with existing project.
  • Winstorecompat, a work-in-progress convenience library that eases conformance with the Windows Store.
  • Better-conforming and faster math support compared to Visual Studio's.

Tools

  • gendef: generate Visual Studio .def files from .dll files.
  • genidl: generate .idl files from .dll files.
  • widl: compile .idl files.

Friend projects

Mingw-w64 interacts a lot with other projects in order to help everyone move forward. Contributions have been going to and coming from these projects:

Most Recent Activity

Jonathan Yong posted a comment on discussion Open Discussion
22.07.2017

Yes, libwinpthread is by definition winpthreads. You'll need to contact mingw-builds about the differences.

Mike H modified a comment on discussion Open Discussion
22.07.2017

I downloaded the installer for mingw-w64 from here: https://sourceforge.net/projects/mingw-w64/files/Toolchains%20targetting%20Win32/Personal%20Builds/mingw-builds/installer/ Then I choose posix and x64. Then the installer downloaded the gcc 7.1.0 toolchain. I double checked and I compared again the static library versions of those files(libpthread.a and Libwinpthread.a.) Different sizes. And with a hex editor I found several names of c-files(for an example mutex.c and nanosleep.c) inside libpthread.a...

Mike H modified a comment on discussion Open Discussion
22.07.2017

I downloaded the installer for mingw-w64 from here: https://sourceforge.net/projects/mingw-w64/files/Toolchains%20targetting%20Win32/Personal%20Builds/mingw-builds/installer/ Then I choose posix and x64. Then the installer downloaded the gcc 7.1.0 toolchain. I double checked and I compared again the static library versions of those files(libpthread.a and Libwinpthread.a.) Different sizes. And with a hex editor I found several names of c-files(for an example mutex.c and nanosleep.c) inside libpthread.a...

Mike H posted a comment on discussion Open Discussion
22.07.2017

I downloaded the installer for mingw-w64 from here: https://sourceforge.net/projects/mingw-w64/files/Toolchains%20targetting%20Win32/Personal%20Builds/mingw-builds/installer/ Then I choose posix and x64. Then the installer downloaded the gcc 7.1.0 toolchain. I double checked and I compared again the static library versions of those files(libpthread.a and Libwinpthread.a.) Different sizes. And with a hex editor I found several names of c-files(for an example mutix.c and nanostep.c) inside libpthread.a...

Jonathan Yong posted a comment on discussion Open Discussion
22.07.2017

Possibly because your installed "libpthread" is not from winpthreads, check with whoever provided your download. Check also if you are also comparing a static import library ".dll.a" against a static ".a" library, the static library is expected to be bigger.

Mike H modified a comment on discussion Open Discussion
22.07.2017

Thank you :). I prefer mingw-w64, but tdm is nice too. But why is libpthread a bigger file compare to libwinpthread? And if they are the same, why not just include one of them? Sorry for my questions, but I like to learn new things :). Yes I'm using winpthreads and downloaded the posix-version. After g++ I write - lwinpthread and other stuff that I need to compile.

Mike H modified a comment on discussion Open Discussion
22.07.2017

Thank you :). I prefer mingw-w64, but tdm is nice too. But why are libpthread a bigger file compare to libwinpthread? And if they are the same, why not just include one of them? Sorry for my questions, but I like to learn new things :). Yes I'm using winpthreads and downloaded the posix-version. After g++ I write - lwinpthread and other stuff that I need to compile.

Mike H posted a comment on discussion Open Discussion
22.07.2017

Thank you :). I prefer mingw-w64, but tdm is nice too. But why are libpthread a bigger file compare to libwinpthread? And if they are the same, why not just include one of them? Sorry for my questions, but I like to learn new things :). Yes I'm using winpthread. After g++ I write - lwinpthread and other stuff that I need to compile.

Jonathan Yong posted a comment on discussion Open Discussion
22.07.2017

TDM is TDM, you need to check with TDM since he does his own changes. Winpthreads installs both libpthread and libwinpthread, so if you are really using winpthreads, they're the same thing. (Winpthreads is not to be confused with pthreads-win32, which is another pthread implementation).

Mike H modified a comment on discussion Open Discussion
22.07.2017

I was asking around, and did some research by my own. I don't know if it's 100% correct answer. But using -lpthread includes codes(when it needs to) from c-files like clock.c, cond.c, misc.c, mutex.c, nanosleep.c, ref.c, sched.c, sem.c, spinlock.c, thread.c. Which will make your own code compatible(as much as possible) with other system like Linux. But using -lwinpthread uses functions build inside Windows, and can't guaranty to be compatible with other systems, like Linux and Mac. Even if your code...